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Posts Tagged: ladybugs

A Lady Beetle and Gulf Fritillary Caterpillars

What's this?

 

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, sharing stories with Gulf Fritillary caterpillars?

 

Well, not likely.

 

The lady beetle (family Coccinellidae) preys mainly on aphids--it can eat about 50 aphids a day or some 5000 aphids in its lifetime. But it will devour other soft-bodied insects, including mites, scales, mealybugs, leafhoppers, and butterfly eggs and larvae (caterpillars). Butterfly caterpillars move quite slowly; they are not Indy 500 speedsters.

 

We spotted a lady beetle early this morning on one of our passionflower (Passiflora) seed pods, surrounded by hungry Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillars. It was  somewhat like a two-peas-in-a-pod scene, but without the peas.  Here were two insect species ON a pod, and both sharing the same warning color: red.

 

The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars are hungry.  Very hungry. They've stripped the passionflower vine of all its leaves and are now eating the stems and seed pods. Actually, we planted the passionflower vine for them.  But are they THAT hungry? They are. They're famished. And there are literally hundreds of them.

 

Sometimes we think that all of the Gulf Frit butterflies west of Mississippi are gravitating toward the plant to lay their eggs. The vine cannot support that many hungry caterpillars,  despite predation by scrub jays and European paper wasps.

 

The lady beetle, we assume is not only eating the tiny yellow eggs of the Gulf Frit, but the tiniest of the tiny larvae.  It's an exquisite buffet of tasty treats with high nutritional value.

 

And easy pickings. 

Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new
Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new "friends"--Gulf Fritillary caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new "friends"--Gulf Fritillary caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars move around the lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary caterpillars move around the lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars move around the lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A touching moment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A touching moment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A touching moment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars will grow up to look like this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary caterpillars will grow up to look like this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars will grow up to look like this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 29, 2014 at 4:29 PM

Ah, Ladybugs!

Consider the lady beetle, aka ladybug.

It's not a bug, but a beetle. It belong to the family Coccinellidae, and scientists have described about 5000 species worldwide, and about 450 in North America. 

Some quick facts...

Ladybugs are not always red with black spots.  The colors can be red, yellow, orange, gray, black, brown and pink. And, not all ladybugs have spots. Some have stripes and some have neither spots nor stripes.

Coccinellid are omnivores, dining on soft-bodied insects such as aphids, as well as plants. Aphids?  A single ladybug can eat some 5000 aphids during its short life span of three to six weeks.

Ladybugs are considered good luck. If a ladybug lands on you, Lady Luck is supposed to smile on you.

This ladybug (below) landed on me on the grounds of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis.

I'm still waiting for Lady Luck.

When a ladybug lands on you, it's considered good luck. A gentle push and this one took flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
When a ladybug lands on you, it's considered good luck. A gentle push and this one took flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a ladybug lands on you, it's considered good luck. A gentle push and this one took flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Ladybugs Coming Up in the World

Decisions, decisions...

Where's the best spot for the new residents of my garden?

I acquired two ladybugs last Saturday during the 99th annual UC Davis Picnic Day. Background: as part of the campuswide celebration, the Department of Entomology annually hosts an all-out bugfest at the Bohart Museum of Entomology and at Briggs Hall. And keeping with the Briggs Hall tradition, the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program gifted picnickers with the treasured ladybugs.

Now ladybugs aren't really "bugs"; they're beetles. Neither are they all "ladies"; some have manly qualities. (Gender issues may confuse us, but not the lady and gentlemen beetles.) 

A ladybug is a good beneficial insect. It can devour an estimated 5000 aphids in its lifetime (three to six weeks).

So, every year for the past several years, I've adopted two ladybugs, chauffered them home, and tucked them in our garden. "Please eat the aphids," I tell them.

And they do.

They're good at following instructions. 

Last year they took up residence in a bed of red roses. This year, they're coming up in the world--a high rise.  A tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) is "home sweet home."

Life doesn't get any better than this if you're a ladybug (and any worse if you're an aphid).

Two ladybugs in a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two ladybugs in a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two ladybugs in a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybugs exploring the menu. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ladybugs exploring the menu. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybugs exploring the menu. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hmm, looks like an aphid over there to me. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hmm, looks like an aphid over there to me. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hmm, looks like an aphid over there to me. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Sure Sign of Spring

What's red and black with yellow all over?

Ladybugs, aka lady beetles or ladybird beetles, laying their yellow eggs.

It's a sure sign of spring when aphids emerge, and ladybugs feast on them. One ladybug can reportedly eat 5000 aphids in its lifetime.

That's a lot of aphids!

Meanwhile, the aphids in the fava beans at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a half-acre bee friendly garden on Bee Biology Road, University of California, Davis, are doing their part.

The garden, located next to the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, is teeming with aphids on the fava beans.

And teaming with ladybugs in the process of adding more ladybugs to the garden.

If you're looking to get involved with ladybugs as a citizen scientist, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., hosts "The Lost Ladybug Project" to spotlight the ladybugs of North America. On the website, you can learn to identify them, understand their biology, and upload photos.

And it wouldn't hurt to include a photo of a ladybug dining on a scumptious aphid.

Ladybugs mating; the female continues to munch aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ladybugs mating; the female continues to munch aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybugs mating; the female continues to munch aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up shot of ladybug eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up shot of ladybug eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up shot of ladybug eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Panoramic view of ladybugs, aphids, and ladybug eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Panoramic view of ladybugs, aphids, and ladybug eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Panoramic view of ladybugs, aphids, and ladybug eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 10:27 PM

Home Sweet Home

This photo of a flameskimmer dragonfly, the work of Rachel Dalmas of Fairfield, won best of division. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's good to see county and state fairs focusing on bugs 'n bees.

These displays inform, educate and entertain.

The California State Fair, Sacramento, traditionally features an Insect Pavilion, which includes exotic and invasive species. This year's state fair also showcased UC Davis displays: insect specimens (and live ones, too) from the Bohart Museum of Entomology and a bee observation hive from the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility.

For the last several years, the Dixon May Fair's Floriculture Building has housed Bohart specimens and a Laidlaw bee observation hive.

The 63rd annual Solano County Fair, Vallejo, now under way, is also bee-and-bug friendly. If you head over to McCormack Hall, the first thing you see is a skep or dome-shaped bee hive. (Beekeepers in many parts of the world still use skeps, commonly made of twisted straw.) 

The McCormack Hall skep symbolizes "Home, Sweet Home," the theme of the fair.

Last Sunday we watched McCormack Hall superintendent Elisa Seppa and assistant superintendent Gloria Gonzalez prepare the ceramic skep/bees/bears display (on loan from the California State Fair), as another Solano County Fair employee Deborah Miller lent her artistic touch to the exhibitor displays.

The fair, which opened Wednesday, Aug. 1 and continues through Sunday, Aug. 5, also includes a number of insect-themed work from exhibitors. This is sort of like BYOB (Bring Your Own Bug.)

Rachel Dalmas, 15, of Fairfield is exhibiting a close-up image (and a best-of-division winner) of a flameskimmer dragonfly. Desirae Rivas, 8, of the Travis Youth Center, painted a ladybug and titled it quite succinctly: "Lady Bug Painting." It won a blue ribbon.

Is there a (future) entomologist in the house?

Elisa Seppa (left), superintendent of McCormack Hall, Solano County Fair and assistant superintendent Gloria Gonzalez work on a skep display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Elisa Seppa (left), superintendent of McCormack Hall, Solano County Fair and assistant superintendent Gloria Gonzalez work on a skep display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Elisa Seppa (left), superintendent of McCormack Hall, Solano County fFair and assistant superintendent Gloria Gonzalez work on a skep display. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

McCormack Hall assistant Deborah Miller of Vallejo just finished installing this display, which includes colorful ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
McCormack Hall assistant Deborah Miller of Vallejo just finished installing this display, which includes colorful ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

McCormack Hall assistant Deborah Miller of Vallejo just installing this display, which includes colorful ladybugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 2, 2012 at 11:42 PM

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